Recommended Reading

Recommended Reading

The Solar Schoolhouse is a K-12 energy education program developed by The Rahus Institute in 2001. The program introduces students to the concepts of solar energy in a fun, intriguing, and meaningful way. They offer workshops, kits, resources, and lots more. Check out their website: http://www.solarschoolhouse.net/index.html.

Energy for Keeps: Electricity from Renewable Energy” is a helpful book: www.energyforkeeps.org.

The National Energy Education Development Project (www.need.org/) has been working with teachers for over 30 years. They have a wealth of resources to buy or download.

The National Renewable Energy Laboratory has a variety of resources for K-12, college and adult learners, including competitions. Professional development opportunities for teachers at all levels are also available. http://www.nrel.gov/learning/

The U.S. Department of Energy has lesson plans, links, activities, and information for teachers and students on a variety of energy and efficiency topics at apps1.eere.energy.gov/education/lessonplans/. More information is also available from the Energy Information Administration: www.eia.doe.gov/kids/.

The Photovoltaic Education Network has an online CD-ROM-style tutorial which provides more detailed information on PV technology for educators (http://pveducation.org/).

A comprehensive technical reference on photovoltaic technology design and installation can be found in the book, Photovoltaic Systems, by James Dunlop.

The California Energy Commission has an interactive website on energy topics at www.energyquest.ca.gov/.

The Florida Solar Energy Center has lots of materials for K-12 teachers and students, plus links to other websites at www.fsec.ucf.edu/en/education/k-12/curricula/index.htm.

For current energy news from around the world, see the magazine, “Renewable Energy World.” http://www.renewableenergyworld.com/rea/home

The American Solar Energy Society website provides information on the ASES National Solar Conference, SOLAR TODAY magazine, and the ASES National Solar Tour http://www.ases.org/.

To learn more about wind power, check out the American Wind Energy Association website at http://www.awea.org/index.aspx.

The KidWind Project provides great information for teachers and students on wind power, classroom activities, resources, challenges, and workshops just for students and teachers. http://www.kidwind.org/

The GreenLearning Canada Foundation provides teachers with free, online education programs about energy and sustainability. http://www.greenlearning.ca/

There is also plenty of information on renewable energy and how to calculate your carbon footprint on BEF's main website http://www.b-e-f.org/.